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Experience every shade of autumn on a walk through Savernake forest

Posted on 05th November 2016

As much as you might miss the sunshine of the summer, no one can deny that the British autumn season can be truly spectacular. A rainbow of colours are unleashed on hedgerows and forests around the country around this time of year, but few compare to the splendour of Savernake Forest in Wiltshire. November is the perfect time to visit the Savernake Forest, as the trees are just beginning to change into their glorious autumnal colours. If you’re planning a Wiltshire cottage holiday for an autumn getaway, a trip to this ancient forest is a must.

Walking in Savernake Forest is to walk through geological history. As Wiltshire Walks explains: “Savernake (or ‘Safernoc’ as mentioned in a Charter of 934), is well over 1000 years old, and is the only privately-owned forest in England. It is 4500 acres in size, although in the mid-18th century Savernake extended to some 40,000 acres.” Within this vast acreage of woodland, many of the ancient Oak trees are over 600 years old. One, named Big Belly Oak, is thought to be as old as the forest itself – up to 1100 years standing!

To experience the Wiltshire autumn season in all its glory, here is our guide to walking in the Savernake Forest in colours.

Burnt orange leaves

Burnt Orange Leaved Trees

Image credit: Judy Dean (VisualHunt)

The many sessile oak trees in the Savernake Forest mean that an abundance of fiery orange hues are unleashed during the autumn months. According to The Woodland Trust, “The Big Belly Oak is one of the most famous trees in the country; the 11+ metre girthed Sessile Oak can be found in the Royal Hunting Forest of Savernake in Wiltshire and has allegedly been around since the time of William The Conqueror.” This grand tree stands proudly in the forest, gaining hundreds of visitors each year. There is no better place to see those iconic orange hues than on the oaks at Savernake.

Golden Beech trees

Golden Beech Trees

Image credit: Brian Robert Marshall (Creative Commons via Geograph)

Beech trees are another British species that are traditionally associated with autumn due to the shades they take on during these transitional months. From November, you can expect to see the forest’s many beech trees assume a soft, golden hue, giving a warm glow to all that they surround as the morning sun shines through their leaves. A plethora of ancient chestnut trees in the woodland add bright sunshine hues to the scene.

Intense reds

Red Maple Leaves

Image credit: Rottnapples (VisualHunt)

Scattered among the golden tones of orange and yellow, several flaming red trees and bushes add intensity to the scenery in Savernake Forest. From the rust-coloured pedunculate oaks to the blood-maroon shades of the stunning maples and the sycamores with their eye-catching assortment of greens, yellows, oranges and the deepest reds, the forest appears almost ablaze in the autumn months. The presence of red deer, which can occasionally be spotted by discerning walkers, adds to this effect. Savernake Estate says, “All main deer species are present in Savernake Forest, including Red, Roe, and ever-increasing numbers of Muntjac, though the biggest numbers are made up by the most native of all British Deer – the Fallow.”

Beautiful browns

Brown Wild Mushrooms

Image credit: Clearwater1967 (VisualHunt)

As the leaves fall to the ground and lie there to nourish the soil, subtle shades of brown line the pathways you will walk along during your visit to Savernake Forest. This, taken in alongside the curious shapes of the monumental tree limbs of ancient trees such as ‘Cathedral Oak’ and ‘The King of Limbs’ brings the natural shades of brown in the Forest together as the perfect backdrop to the vivid colours of the remaining leaves. At ground level, look out for unique varieties of mushrooms and fungi which range from cream to brown and even bright oranges.

Luscious Greens

Green Foliage

Image credit: ToucheD (DeviantArt)

Of course, among the warm-hued larch tree species, Savernake Forest is home to a variety of deciduous trees that keep their leaves throughout the autumn and winter, bringing refreshing green colours to any landscape. A few pines feature in the skyline as well as oak varieties which largely maintain their green hues, along with ferns and grass species that hint continuously towards the coming spring.

To experience the kaleidoscope of colours that is Savernake Forest, take a look at the routes suggested on Wiltshire Walks for advice on all of the best paths to follow to find these flame-coloured trees. There is no better way to spend a crisp morning than leaving the warmth of your Wiltshire holiday cottage and heading out into the warm shades of this ancient forest.