1. Skip to navigation
  2. Skip to content
  3. Skip to sidebar

Email

Phone 01747 828170



WWI chalk emblem restored to former glory in Wiltshire

Posted on 18th September 2017

Wiltshire is known for the many ‘white horse’ chalk hill figures which are dotted around its beautiful countryside, but it is a different kind of animal carving that is currently receiving the most attention.

Members of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment

Created in 1916, a 100ft-high chalk reproduction of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment’s emblem – an Indian blackbuck antelope – had been neglected over the last 20 years, making it all but invisible on the hillside overlooking the village of Sutton Mandeville, where around 2,000 soldiers were based during World War One.

However, a Heritage Lottery Fund grant worth £88,300 was recently confirmed, allowing for crucial restoration work to be carried out on the hill figure, which has now been well and truly brought back to its former glory. Furthermore, a new honeycomb geotextile has been installed underneath the carving, which should ensure that it remains undamaged in the years to come.

Be sure to visit the fascinating chalk carving, and the many others which grace the county, when you next stay at one of our luxury holiday rentals in Wiltshire.

Image Credit: PhotosNormandie

Albino sparrows spotted in Wiltshire

Posted on 10th June 2017

We have all become accustomed to seeing the hearty speckled sparrow in nearly every British garden, and sightings of sparrows in Wiltshire should not cause much of a stir. However albino sparrows are somewhat of a rarity and pairs of albino sparrows even more so.

Sparrow bathing

When enjoying a retreat in a Wiltshire cottage holiday, you are more likely to see this rarity than ever thanks to a community of people living on the Kennet and Avon Canal in Wiltshire. The birds that have been spotted are leucistic, meaning they have partial pigmentation loss. Though their feathers may be white, they are not fully albino, which would be signified by pink eyes such as in other species.

Thought to be the first pair ever spotted, other albino and white sparrows have been seen previously, with a sighting in Norfolk in 2015 and an albino sparrow photographed in Sanctuary Lakes, Melbourne, Australia in the same year. Unfortunately due to their colouration, albino sparrows are a much more obvious target for predators, meaning they often have shorter life spans, and this is the reason the genetic mutation is so rarely seen. However residents of the local area are ‘feeding them and taking care of them’.

Unfortunately it is not just white sparrows who are under threat, the common house sparrow has experienced a gradual decline over the last century. The RSPB are doing their best to raise awareness of the issue: “House sparrow numbers were not monitored adequately before the mid-1970s. Since then, numbers in rural England have nearly halved while numbers in towns and cities have declined by 60 per cent. Because of these large population declines, the house sparrow is now red-listed as a species of high conservation concern.”

Image Credit: Kurt Bauschardt

The fun side of foraging

Posted on 25th May 2017

Recent news has brought to light the sheer amount of food waste in both homes and retail, leading to a market U-turn in attitudes towards left-overs. From Asda’s wonky vegetable boxes to the increase in left over recipes, we are moving away from mass production and looking to become more self-sufficient with our food.

blackberries ripening

There has been a similar increased interest in foraging. While many people remember scouting hedgerows for blackberries for grandma’s apple pie, few people have done more than that since. Restaurants have been busy jumping on the bandwagon of wildly grown goods and appealing to those who want to reduce the air miles as well as the food waste. Native is such a restaurant based in London that aims to allow their customers to appreciate nature. Native is uncompromising on their ethos and looks to inspire others to similar goals.

“Native looks to provide its guests with an original dining experience that encapsulates the country’s best wild food that is native to the UK through a combination of innovative cooking and country thrift. Our food looks to unite the country’s best foraged foods and game in a laid back, full flavour adventure through the British seasons.”

While you may want to direct your new-found enthusiasm to your nearest scrap of woodland, foraging requires knowledge and an inherent respect for natural spaces. While enjoying a Wiltshire cottage holiday, what better way to ease yourself closer to your foraging future than with a beginner’s course into the edible aspects of nature? The Wild Side of Life has different courses throughout the year and based in Wiltshire to initiate you into the lifestyle.

Whether it is a few wild flowers added to a salad or a meal of morels, we can all add a little more of nature’s bounty into our diets, and foraging for the ingredients can be as much fun as eating them.

 Image Credit: Living in Monrovia

Wiltshire’s wild side – the best wildlife parks and attractions

Posted on 27th March 2017

Wiltshire certainly has a wild side, as it boasts a number of fascination wildlife parks and attractions that you and the whole family can enjoy.

Wildlife parks and attractions in Wiltshire

The wildlife parks are great to visit all year round, no matter what the weather, so if you and your family are heading on a Wiltshire cottage holiday this year then here are some of the top parks and attractions you can visit during your stay.

Wild attractions and parks

Longleat Safari and Adventure Park 

Longleat Safari Park

One of the UK’s best and most iconic safari parks, Longleat is located in the heart of Wiltshire. 

This safari drive through takes you closer to wild animals than ever before as you pass through a lion paddock, hunt down the resident wolf pack, see the enormity of the white rhino and elephant and get an up-close look at friendly deer and cheeky monkeys.

You can also feed giraffes and meet zebras as well as go on a jungle cruise on the lake to visit Gorilla Island, watch playful sea lions and hand feed lorikeets. If you want even more animal encounters then the bat cave and Ray Bay are well worth a visit too.

Children can spend hours exploring Longleat’s Adventure Castle as different areas of the playground have been designed for different age groups. There’s a giant ball pool, softball cannons, a splash pad, a lion heart castle and an interactive art wall to name just a few.

You can also explore the famous house and work your way through the hedge maze. 

Forest Falconry

Forest Falconry

There’s just something spectacular about seeing stunning birds of prey spread their wings and glide through the air.

At Forest Falconry, near Landford in Wiltshire, you can explore 12 acres of woodland and meet 50 species of birds of prey, including eagles, owls, hawks and falcons. During your visit you will help train and fly these majestic birds.

Bush Farm Bison Centre

Bison can be seen at Bush Farm Bison Centre

It is pretty special to see bison in the UK and at Bush Farm Bison Centre you can learn all about this mammoth animal and get within touching distance of them.

The farm is tucked away in the woods at the southern tip of West Knoyle, but it offers a great day out for you and the family as there are other animals like raccoons, elk, rhea, chipmunks, praire dogs and guanaco you can see.

There are lots of lakes on the site that you can walk to and a 30-acre ancient woodland you can explore as well as a museum room and a gallery. The gallery is full of Native American artefacts such as buffalo robes and paintings.

Monkey World

Orangutan

Opened in 1987 as a refuge for confiscated chimpanzees that were stolen from the wild, Monkey World now homes the largest group of chimpanzees outside of Africa with more than 250 primates of 20 different species living at the centre.

You can walk around the beautiful woodland and watch the primates playing in their families just like you would in the wild.

You will be blown away by the orangutan crèche, which is the only one in Europe and offers a home to orangutans from around the world.

The centre combines conservation with education as it runs half-hourly talks about man’s closest living relatives. There are also picnic sites, cafes and a large children’s play area boasting slides, swings and climbing frames.

Roves Farm

You can see farm animals at Roves Farm

If you want to see a traditional British farm with a twist, then Roves Farm is a must-visit.

The attraction is a great family day out offering you free tractor rides around the 166-hectare site, and a large variety of farm animals like sheep, cattle, pigs, goats, donkeys and Shetland ponies. You can also handle chicks, rabbits and guinea pigs in the pet’s corner.

The attraction is great to visit all-year round as it is home to indoor attractions like an indoor heated play barn and kids craft sessions as well as outdoor attractions like an outdoor play area, den building activities, walks and animal races.

Wild animals you can see in Wiltshire

Wiltshire has a rich diversity of habitats and as a result, you may come across a number of species during your stay in one of our rural Wiltshire holiday cottages.

Birds

Skylark

There are a number of different birds that you can see across Wiltshire’s farmlands.

Common sightings include grey partridge, yellow wagtails, quails and tree sparrows, but if you decide to go for a walk in the evening you could see a barn owl on the lookout for some food.

If you are staying in Salisbury then the Salisbury Plains are home to a variety of birds including endangered species like the skylark, linnet and stone curlew.

Butterflies

There are 40 species of butterfly in Wiltshire

According to the Wiltshire and Swindon Biological Records Centre butterfly fauna in the county is one of the richest in the UK as over 40 species of butterfly have been known to breed in Wiltshire.

There are even species that are only found in the county such as the silver-spotted skipper, silver-studded blue, grayling and pearl-bordered fritillary.

Mammals

Red deer live in Wiltshire’s forests

There is a large population of different mammals living in Wiltshire.

Some are seen all across the country as well-known mammals like hedgehogs, badgers, moles and foxes are commonly seen all over Wiltshire.

However, the county is also home to a number of protected mammals such as the dormouse and the brown hare.

There are even 13 different species of bats and they can be found at old working mines such as Box Mines.

If you are walking along Wiltshire’s rivers then keep your eye open for otters and water voles, while a stroll through a wooded area could see you come across roe and red deer and grey squirrel.

 

Where to spot the first signs of spring in Wiltshire

Posted on 26th February 2017

After many months cooped up inside and the indulgences of Christmas and Valentine’s Day, we are all ready to get out in the country and walk off our recent excesses. What better way to invigorate your body and get rid of the cobwebs than with a walk in one of Wiltshire’s glorious gardens? If you are all set to enjoy a spring break in a Wiltshire holiday cottage, then we highly recommend visiting one of these gardens to prepare you for the sunnier days to come. Here is where you can spot the first signs of spring emerging across Wiltshire.

Abbey House Gardens, Malmesbury

Abbey House Gardens, Malmesbury

Image Credit: Heather Cowper (Flickr)

This 12th century abbey was once a site of religious real importance in the UK, being third only to Canterbury and Winchester. Though the gardens have followed the latest fashions and adapted throughout history to fit with what was in vogue, the herb garden that would have been in the gardens centuries ago still remains today. The Abbey House Gardens offer two very different experiences in spring, with swathes of bright spring bulbs present among the beautifully structured knot garden. While those with an eye for a classic garden design will enjoy the juxtaposition of blowsy tulips against conservative hedges, for those looking for a more natural arrangement should continue down into the park’s wild garden. Among the acers and tree ferns, fritillaries and narcissus can be seen breaking through the undergrowth in characteristic clumps.

Broadleas Garden, Devizes

Broadleas Garden

Image Credit: Broadleas Garden

In the spring, this garden is reminiscent of Cornish gardens in all their temperate glory. A lush valley is cleverly planted with azaleas, camellias and magnolias, with spring bulbs scattered in a beautifully haphazard manner beneath and between them. For those looking for a more formal garden, they can be found closer to the house. If you are looking for wildlife as well as flowers, then you are in luck. Broadleas not only houses its own orchard and bee garden, but bee hives border the south east corner, lending a lively vibe to the gardens.

Bowood House and Gardens, Derry Hill

Bowood House and Gardens, Derry Hill

Image Credit: Geoff Doggett (Publicdomainpictures.net)

Bowood house is a stunning backdrop, but the true star of the show is the gardens. Set in a space of hundreds of acres, there guaranteed to be something for everyone to enjoy. While the owners have made an effort to engage a younger audience with an adventure playground, a pre-booked garden tour is a must for those who wish to know this garden more intimately. Not only does this give you access to the 4 acre private walled garden at the rear of the house, but it also informs you of how the landscape was developed. A woodland garden shows off the spectacular spring colours in a natural setting, while those on the hunt for a more structured Eden can find solace in the Terrace Gardens and Doric Temple.

Mompesson House, Salisbury

Mompesson House, Salisbury

Image Credit: Bob&Anne Powell (Wikimedia Commons)

Mompesson House is starting its season with a springtime discovery trail. Open from the 11th March 2017, this trail is family-friendly and gives you a helping hand in spotting the early signs of spring. While this is most definitely a town house, it has an exquisite walled garden that is in keeping with the 18th century atmosphere of the house. For those not looking for a long ramble, or who are not quite confident in the weather this early in the year, it is the perfect opportunity to enjoy both nature and history side by side.

The Courts Garden, Holt

The Courts Garden, Holt

Image Credit: Mark Kent (Flickr)

This is a garden of perfection, in both size and layout. The Courts Garden has four different events to revel in the joy of the coming season. Their Spring Flowers event beginning the 25th February that glorifies the flowers that define this time of year, while Snowdrops at the Courts Garden is dedicated to the most delicate of the spring bulbs. Tulips at Courts Garden starts a month later, allowing the flowers in question to truly show off their colourful display while The Artists’ Garden Spring Family Trail ensures that visitors see this season with different eyes as they follow the artist around this special route. Beyond the events, the Courts Garden still has much to offer, including lily ponds and formal gardens, all of which begin to awaken for the spring at this time of year.

National Nature Reserve, Cricklade

National Nature Reserve, Cricklade

Image Credit: Brian Robert Marshall (Geograph)

For those with little interest in formality when experiencing the natural world, the town of Cricklade is the perfect choice. Cricklade National Nature Reserve is situated in North Wiltshire and is charming with its historic buildings and typically English pubs. Situated between the River Churn and the River Thames, the north meadow was initially a hay meadow that has since become a site of Specific Scientific Interest due to one spring bulb that flourishes here in almost impossible numbers. The Snake’s Head Fritillaries are at their best during the second and third week of April, and attract a large number of visitors to the area, so much so that a special Fritillary Watch Website has been created. While 2016 was a disappointing year for these flowers due to the late flooding, there are high hopes for 2017.

West Woods, Marlborough

West Woods, Marlborough

Image Credit: Brian Robert Marshall (Geograph)

Another site that lacks both house and formal gardens, the West Woods are part of Savernake forest and are famed for the swathes of bluebells that appear during May. This piece of Ancient forest has been replanted with beech, ash and birch trees, which allow gorgeous spring sunshine to dapple the woodland floor and play among the bulbs on the famed bluebell weekends. The West Woods are accessible from many other ancient sites in the area, making them an ideal pitstop within a longer country walk at this beautiful time of year.